• SOCIAL STUDIES

    WORLD HISTORY
    5 Credits
    This is a survey course of world history ranging from the 1700s to the 1990s. This course utilizes both a topical and a chronological approach to the study of world history. Students will examine the geography, governments, history, economics, and cultures of the major regions of the world. The course is also designed to aid students in developing a multicultural view of the world, with an increased awareness of the growing interdependence among people today. The course will concentrate on developing the skills, concepts, and discipline needed for future Social Studies courses, as well as for making informed decisions regarding complex issues that face the world in the 21st Century. Students will analyze a variety of primary and secondary source readings, complete a writing assignment every marking period, and write a research paper. *Academic course level (Adaptive, Essentials, College Prep) will be based on the results of the PV Placement Test, available middle school data, as well as sending district recommendation.
    Prerequisite: None

    WORLD HISTORY HONORS
    5 Credits
    The Honors World History program is designed to challenge motivated students and provide them with an in-depth understanding of world history and its connection to present-day events. The class will require more in-depth research and academic work than a regular World History section and will focus on improving the student’s verbal communication, critical-thinking techniques, note taking and outlining skills, research skills, reading and writing ability, and capacity to interpret and analyze primary source materials. This will be accomplished through a variety of methods including research projects, documentbased essays, oral presentations, book reviews, written projects, visual projects, reaction papers, and the study of current events.
    Prerequisite: Eligibility for honors will be based on the results of the Passaic Valley placement tests as well as sending district recommendation

    U.S. HISTORY I
    5 Credits
    This is a survey course of American History ranging from pre-colonial times up to final decades of the 19th century incorporating major concepts that will define the 20th century. This course utilizes both a topical and a chronological approach to the study of America. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking, deduction, and understanding on the students’ part of their rights and responsibilities within the American system. The course will concentrate on developing the skills, concepts, and discipline needed for future social studies courses, as well as for making informed decisions regarding complex issues that face the U.S. in the 21st Century. Students will analyze a variety of primary and secondary source readings, complete a writing assignment every marking period, and write a research paper. *Academic course level will be based on teacher recommendation.
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of World History at the appropriate academic level

    U.S. HISTORY I HONORS
    5 Credits
    U.S. History I Honors is designed to challenge motivated students and provide them with an in-depth understanding of American history and its connection to present-day events. The class will require more in-depth research and academic work than a regular U.S. History section and will focus on improving the student’s verbal communication, critical-thinking techniques, note taking and outlining skills, research skills, reading and writing ability, and capacity to interpret and analyze primary source materials. This will be accomplished through a variety of methods including research projects, document-based essays, oral presentations, book reviews, written projects, visual projects, reaction papers, and the study of current events.
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of World History with a final average of no less than an A (93-96) or World History Honors with no less than a B+ (87-89); Instructor recommendation

    U.S. HISTORY II
    5 Credits
    This is a survey course of American History ranging from the dawn of the 20th century, incorporating major political and economic themes from the 19th century culminating with the effects of the 9/11 attacks and the war on terror. This course utilizes both a topical and a chronological approach to the study of America. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking, deduction, and the understanding on the students’ part of their rights and responsibilities within the American system. The course will concentrate on developing the skills, concepts, and discipline needed for future social studies courses, as well as for making informed decisions regarding complex issues that face the U.S. in the 21st Century. Students will analyze a variety of primary and secondary source readings, complete a writing assignment every marking period, and write a research paper. *Academic course level will be based on teacher recommendation.
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I at the appropriate academic level

    U.S. HISTORY II HONORS
    5 Credits
    The U.S. History II Honors program is designed to challenge motivated students and provide them with an in-depth understanding of American History and its connection to present-day events. The class will require more in-depth research and academic work than a regular U.S. History section, and will focus on improving the student’s verbal communication, critical-thinking techniques, note taking and outlining skills, research skills, reading and writing ability, and capacity to interpret and analyze primary source materials. This will be accomplished through a variety of methods including research projects, documentbased essays, oral presentations, book reviews, written projects, visual projects, reaction papers, and the study of current events. *Students enrolled in this course are eligible for dual enrollment credit through Fairleigh Dickinson University.
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I Honors with a final average of no less than a B+ (87- 89) or U.S. History I with no less than an A (93 or above); Instructor recommendation

    AP WORLD HISTORY: MODERN
    5 Credits
    Grades 9-12
    In AP World History: Modern, students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes from 1200 CE to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course provides six themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: humans and the environment, cultural developments and interactions, governance, economic systems, social interactions and organization, and technology and innovation. The AP course in World History: Modern is intended for motivated students who wish to complete classes while in secondary school equivalent to college introductory courses in World History and Western Civilization. Students in this course are expected to take the AP exam in May.
    Prerequisite: Eligibility will be based on the results of the Passaic Valley placement tests as well as sending district recommendation. If taken after freshman year, then the prerequisites are: successful completion of World History with a final average of no less than an A (93-96) and instructor recommendation; or successful completion of World History Honors with no less than a B+ (87-89) along with instructor recommendation

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
    5 Credits
    Grades 10-12
    Geography answers the questions, Why are things where they are? And so what? Human Geography is the branch of the subject that deals with the study of people and their communities, cultures, economies, and interactions with the environment. Always, the focus is on answering questions and solving problems based on spatial relationships. AP Human Geography, a college level course, introduces students to the systematic study of human patterns of social interaction. Why are borders where they are? What influences the spatial distribution of culture, language, and religion? How do people live their lives in different places and--importantly--how does place influence our lives? Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. The curriculum reflects the goals of the National Geography Standards (2012). Students in this course are expected to take the AP exam in May.
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of World History, U.S. I, or U.S. II with a final average of no less than an A (93 or above) or World History Honors, U.S. I Honors, or U.S. II Honors with a B+ (87-89); Instructor recommendation

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT U.S. HISTORY
    5 Credits
    Grades 11-12
    The AP United States History course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. History. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full- year introductory college courses. Students will learn to assess historical materials – their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance – and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. AP United States History will develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgement and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format. The AP course in U.S. History is intended for motivated students who wish to complete classes while in secondary school equivalent to college introductory courses in U.S. History. There will be a heavy emphasis in this course on reading, writing, and the interpretation of both primary and secondary source documents. Students in this course are expected to take the AP exam in May.
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I/II with a final average of no less than an A (93-96) or U.S. History I/II Honors with no less than a B+ (87-89); Instructor recommendation

    ADVANCED PLACEMENT U.S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
    5 Credits
    Grades 11-12
    The AP United States Government and Politics course will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of the general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics, and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. Students in this course are expected to take the AP exam in May.
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I/II with a final average of no less than an A (93-96) or U.S. History I/II Honors with no less than a B+ (87-89); Instructor recommendation

    CONTEMPORARY ISSUES THROUGH VIDEOCONFERENCING
    5 Credits
    Grades 11-12
    Contemporary technology applications such as videoconferencing, interactive field trips, and social networking promote dialogue with students, educators and experts from around the world. In order to expose students to contemporary issues on the local, national and global levels, the Contemporary Issues through Videoconferencing program is designed to challenge students and to provide them with an indepth understanding of the world’s history and present-day events. It is also designed to aid students in an understanding of globalization and its problems and of the growing interdependence among people and nations today. Students examine the geography, governments, history, economics, and cultures of the major regions of the world. Students should be active in their own learning and this course allows students to design their own learning experiences, all of which concentrates on developing verbal communication, critical thinking, writing skills, historical concepts, and discipline needed for future academic courses, as well as for making informed decisions regarding complex issues that face the world in the 21st century. *This course can be used to meet the 21st Century Skills/Career requirement for graduation.
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I; Instructor recommendation/application required

    THE HOLOCAUST, GENOCIDE & MODERN HUMANITY
    5 Credits
    Grade 12
    The first half of this full-year, college-level, elective course will critically examine both historical and contemporary acts of genocide and “ethnic cleansing” around the world, as well as the psychological and social roots of racism and prejudice. The second half of the course will analyze and evaluate the causes, events, and consequences of the Holocaust – Nazi Germany’s attempt to implement the “Final Solution” against the Jewish population of Europe between 1933 and 1945. *Students enrolled in this course are eligible for dual enrollment credit through Kean University.
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History II

    HUMAN BEHAVIOR
    5 Credits
    Grades 11-12
    One of the basic elements of life as a human being is interacting with other people; the key to a person thriving in social settings then is to understand others as well as you understand yourself. The social science course of human behavior serves as an introduction to the discipline of psychology and allows the student to gain a better sense of human thinking, emotions, and actions. There will be an opportunity for students to gain personal awareness in the areas of assertiveness, creativity, human motives, and reasoning.
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I

    LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
    2.5 Credits
    Grades 11-12
    The social science class of Latin American History and Studies will focus on the impact of Hispanic peoples and Latin American culture, history, society, and contemporary issues in the Americas and specifically, the United States. The core mission of this class is to serve as a complement to the larger focus offered within a sociological curriculum. This course will emphasize critical thinking, advanced writing skills, document analysis and discussion within a focused cultural perspective.
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I

    SOCIOLOGY
    2.5 Credits
    Grades 11-12
    The social science course of sociology focuses on patterns of human behavior. Specifically, sociology examines human groups and institutions, and the cause and effect these groups and institutions have on social issues and problems in American society. The core of the class deals critically with culture and human actions. There is a strong emphasis on reading, writing, and reaction and opinion-based topics, as well as the study of current events.
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I

    SPORTS AND AMERICAN SOCIETY
    2.5 Credits
    Grades 11-12
    Sports have become a microcosm for American society and culture, and have come to reflect the major trends, frustrations, fantasies, and values in the society at large. Studying about sports in any time period gives extraordinary insight into the mind and mood of the people. The fact that three-quarters of the American people daily participate in, watch in person or on TV, talk to their friends, or read about sporting events indicates that sports pervades every facet of American life. Sports infiltrate the educational system, the economy, and the political life of our country, and have become the most popular form of mass entertainment. Students will come to recognize the parallels that exist between sports and society.
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I

    CRIMINAL JUSTICE

    INTRODUCTION TO LAW
    2.5 Credits
    Grades 10-12
    This course is a study of common-law heritage, constitutional, civil, and criminal law, as well as law of evidence, courts, and civil and criminal law procedures. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to differentiate between criminal and civil law, explain the difference between case law and statutory law, describe how the phrase ‘separate but equal’ was applied in the case of Plessy v. Ferguson and describe the tiered structure of the Federal Court System. *11th and 12th grade students enrolled in this course are eligible for dual enrollment credit through Passaic County Community College.
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of World History; Instructor recommendation

    INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE
    2.5 Credits
    Grades 10-12
    This course focuses on the study of law enforcement agencies, their role, function, history, and development within the field of criminal justice. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to; explain the structure of the American criminal justice system; explain the purpose of law; explain the police mission in a democratic society; and explain how the Bill of Rights and subsequent laws help protect personal freedom in society. *11th and 12th grade students enrolled in this course are eligible for dual enrollment credit through Passaic County Community College.
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of World History; Instructor recommendation